Choosing a wedding motif : the meaning of colors

So, I am now planning a wedding… but for some reason, it’s not mine but for a dear cousin. Still the thought of wedding planning is enough to make my heart do a cartwheel, yeheh! And to have something to read back when I prepare for my own wedding in the future, I’ll be blogging my first a la J-Lo/Mary Fiore of The Wedding Planner movie journey.

Perhaps the first thing that most brides-to-be would think of for the wedding is the motif. There are several reasons why we choose a certain motif –be it our favorite color, the color is not commonly used, etc — but how about we look at the meaning behind the color? Here are some favorite wedding motifs and their meaning.

Red – Red represents beauty in many languages and cultures. In China, it is associated with good luck and fortune. To the Hindu, red symbolizes joy, life, energy, and creativity.It provides a sense of protection from fears and anxiety. It is the highest arc in the rainbow. Red draws attention and a keen use of red as an accent can immediately focus attention on a particular element.

http://www.onewhitedress.net

Blue – Blue is seen as trustworthy, dependable, and committed. The color of ocean and sky, blue is perceived as a constant in our lives. As the collective color of the spirit, it invokes rest and can cause the body to produce chemicals that are calming.

http://www.lovelywedding.info

Pink – Brighter pinks are youthful, fun, and exciting, while vibrant pinks have the same high energy as red; they are sensual and passionate without being too aggressive. Toning down the passion of red with the purity of white results in the softer pinks that are associated with romance and the blush of a young woman’s cheeks.


It’s not surprising that when giving or receiving flowers, pink blossoms are a favorite. Pink is the color of happiness and is sometimes seen as lighthearted. For women who are often overworked and overburdened, an attraction to pink may speak of a desire for the more carefree days of childhood.

daweddings.wordpress.com

Green occupies more space in the spectrum visible to the human eye than most colors, and is second only to blue as a favorite color. The natural greens, from forest to lime, are seen as tranquil and refreshing, with a natural balance of cool and warm (blue and yellow) undertones. Green is considered the color of peace and ecology.

http://lemonandlimeevent.com

Yellow shines with optimism, enlightenment, and happiness. Shades of golden yellow carry the promise of a positive future. Yellow will advance from surrounding colors and instill optimism and energy, as well as spark creative thoughts.

fashionweddingdresses.co.uk

Purple embodies the balance of red’s stimulation and blue’s calm.With a sense of mystic and royal qualities, purple is a color often well liked by very creative or eccentric types and is the favorite color of adolescent girls.

fashiondesigncollection.com

Orange is used to symbolize happiness and love.Fun and flamboyant orange radiates warmth and energy.

pingliving.eu

Hard to pick one? How about a rainbow motif? That’s actually my cousin’s choice 😀

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Color meaning source: http://www.sensationalcolor.com

Sunday fun overload

You know those times when you are having so much fun and you just can’t help but relish the sweetness of life? Today is one of those with my partner in crime Ate Sheila. Although I woke up a bit late, I’m still able to wash some of my laundry before heading off to our first stop, Big Bite Bangkok. Big Bite is a series of outdoor markets featuring the best of the city’s small-scale artisanal food producers. You can sample big bites of the food for free but you can also purchase more if you want to take some home. Donations are encouraged. All proceeds will go to In Search of Sanuk, a non-profit benefitting the needy in Bangkok. About $1,000 was raised today!

After making our belly happy, we went to Dasa bookstore. They sell secondhand English books at very low prices. There are only few English bookstores in Thailand and most of them are very expensive. What I hate about going to Dasa though is that I can’t leave the place empty-handed. They have almost all the books I can die for. As a result, I keep hoarding more books even before I finish reading the others. But despite my indulgence I always go home super happy.

We then walked to Queen Sirikit park just beside Emporium. One of the things I love about Bangkok is that in the midst of the metropolitan’s skycrapers there are plenty of parks to relax and just be still.

We hiked the next train station and just enjoyed the walk while taking some snaps of the typical Bangkok street. And just before we hop in the train, a splendid dusk stunned us in awe. Rainbow colors crept from the clouds, such beauty I have never seen before.

A delicious Thai food dinner was savored with Neil. Before heading out the mall we dropped by at the DVD shop to search for good movies. And finally our last trip for the day, lightning photography 😀 Ate Sheila was patient enough to wait for the next lightning to strike. When it finally came I gushed with excitement causing her to capture a shaky photo. Oopps my bad.

Now gotta read my newly hoarded book, Stumbling on happiness by Daniel Gilbert, before going to sleep. La dolce vita! What a wonderful world indeed 🙂

On the spotlight: Celebrity moment? Certainly not!

Being a history buff — and lover of anything vintage-looking — a visit at historical places particularly the Blue Mosque and Hagia Sofia, the Greek Patriarchal cathedral of Constantinople in Istanbul was something that kept me consoled from missing a lot of family gatherings and out of town trips (and snorkeling!) this month when cousins came home.

At Blue Mosque my colleagues went to the loo and asked me to just meet them near the gate so I was left to myself. Captivated by the maginificent beauty of the architecture — considered to be the last great mosque of the classical period — I lose touch of the present as I delve into the soul of the place. I was brought back to reality by a teenage girl. She doesn’t speak English but her hand gestures seem like she’s asking me to take a photo of them. I smiled and said sure. She looked very excited as she rummage inside her bag for her camera while asking me where I’m from. I said the Philippines, extended my hand to get hold of her camera only to realize that she wants to have a photo with me. I cannot grapple any sense out of the fuss but I gladly granted her request. (Pose, awkward smile, click)

I continued roaming around only to find another group of girls asking me the same thing! Okay, that was the second. I started to wonder why but still consented their whim.

There were too many people at the mosque and getting a good shot was pretty hard. I was occupied with finding the right angle when another group of girls approached me… again? Could it be that they have mistaken me for someone known in their place? But that doesn’t make sense, not with me. I felt it’s time to leave. I went to the meeting place but couldn’t find my colleagues. A group of teenage boys came and asked me for, well, a photo with them. I said no. I started to panic. Feeling pretty was never an option especially in a place stormed by foreigners. All I could think of where horrible possibilities.

What are they gonna do with those photos? There was an ongoing protest around the area. Could it be that I look like someone suspicious or an enemy with my costume all in black (remembering the time when wearing red in Thailand is…) except for my colored scarf? But why do they look beguiled? Will I die in this place? Scenes out of my paranoia caught me literally trembling with fear.

An old man was standing behind me. I took the risk and asked him why those people wanted to take a photo with me (rather know why before I die eh). Just when he was about to answer another group of men approached us, guess you can tell why. Sensing my discomfort, he shooed them away. Then he said, “maybe it is because you are pretty and your dress is more contemporary. If you are feeling suspicious, just tell them no.” It dawned on me that I might have looked too scared that he thought I was being suspicious of his compatriots. That was rather embarrassing.

My Turkish sim no longer has credit and I don’t know how to request for an emergency call. My Philippine roaming sim doesn’t have credit too (lesson learned, always have your roaming loaded when travelling abroad) and my Thai sim is just useless. I started searching for someone who could speak English and lend me a mobile so I could call my colleagues.

Three little girls — I’m guessing grade schoolers — came, said ‘Hi’ in a very sweet way and asked where I’m from. I said Thailand (change of address but not really, paranoia on). While the one who speaks little English tried to make a conversation, the other one took her camera and started snapping (should I just forget about the fear and started feeling like a celebrity then? Good try but not the kind of situation one can find humor with. Nice talking to myself). I asked them if I could use their phone to make a call. While trying to make them understand that I want to call someone, more teenage girls started to gather around us. Finally they understood and lend me the mobile. I turned my back on them as I made the call avoiding the… omg cameras! Very strange.

On the way back to the hotel I found an abandoned house filled with grasses and white flowers. I just loved the sight of it. I sat on the bench in front still bemused by the incident at the mosque. I calmed myself down by taking pictures. Then the words of the old man flashed back, “maybe it is because your dress is more contemporary”. I dress very simply and if they still see me that way, then I can’t help but feel deep sadness. Surely, that simple act stems from a more profound reasons. I silently wished that it’s not because they see things in me that were deprived of them. Many things crossed my mind, some of them the worst plight experienced by other women.

While relaying the story to my friends earlier, I remembered an article I read in the newspaper on the plane on our way to Istanbul. I know very little about the place and never had time to do some readings so I thought the newspaper will give me a glimpse. The news was about a 23-year old woman who killed her husband as a self-defense after he beat her just because she look at a naked man from a movie they’re both watching!

I was reminded of the book, A thousand splendid suns by Khaled Hosseini which is a story of two Afghan women. It is very sad that so many women do not enjoy the kind of freedom that we are having in different aspects particularly in making choices on how to run their own lives. The issues they face are too many to mention, some too complicated to digest.

I never thought I would ever encounter such a strange experience. But I’m thankful for it made me appreciate the kind of womanhood I’m blessed with. Many women don’t realize the kind of power they possess to influence the society and make a positive change. Hopefully women in a free society will be able to extend their hands to those women binded by men’s power and not just be too engulfed with fashion and make ups.